Stats & Skills

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Contents

Stats

In this game, there are six key stats that make up your character: Strength, Dexterity, Intelligence, Wisdom, Charisma, and Luck. Each of these stats represents a different aspect of your character and has its own unique impact on the game. Let’s take a closer look at each of these stats and how they affect your character:

  • Strength is a stat that reflects how physically strong and healthy your character is. A character with a high Strength has a well-developed body, making them robust, powerful, and healthy. Conversely, a character with a low Strength has a weaker body, making them more fragile.

  • Dexterity represents your character’s speed and agility. A high Dexterity means your character has quick reflexes and can dodge and move quickly. On the other hand, a low Dexterity indicates your character is slow to react, and their movements may be clumsy.

  • Intelligence represents your character’s intellectual abilities. A character with high Intelligence possesses a sharp mind, good memory, and can easily comprehend complex ideas. Conversely, a character with low Intelligence may struggle with learning new things and recalling information quickly.

  • Wisdom represents how aware and intuitive your character is. A character with high Wisdom has a clear perception and understanding of the world around them. They are able to notice details that others may miss. Conversely, a character with low Wisdom may be more easily distracted and less able to grasp the bigger picture.

  • Charisma assesses a character’s strength of character, power of persuasion, magnetic presence. A character with high Charisma has an easy time talking to people, and can easily persuade or lie to others. On the other hand, a character with low Charisma is probably not a people person, and may have more trouble with the words they say.

  • Luck represents the fortune that your character has. A character with high Luck is favored by the coincidences of the world, allowing them to seize opportunities that would otherwise pass them by. On the other hand, a character with low Luck is often cursed by the coincidences of the world, as misfortunes seem to befall them more frequently.

Determining your Stats

There are two ways to determine your stats: you can either roll your stats or determine them with a point buy system (depending on the GM’s choice).

Advice: If you are unsure how to distribute your stats, you can refer to the Classes section and determine what class you want to play. There are notes describing which stats are most important for each class, which can help you decide how to allocate your stats.

Rolling for Stats

In this game, you determine your stats by rolling 2d4s twice for each stat. After rolling, choose the highest value from the first 2d4s roll and the lowest value from the second 2d4s roll. Subtract the lowest value from the highest value, and that will be your stat. You will repeat this process six times for each of your stats.

For example, if you roll a 3 and a 1 on the first 2d4s, you would choose 3 as the highest value. Then, if you roll a 4 and a 2 on the second 2d4s, you would choose 2 as the lowest value. You then subtract the lowest value of 2 from the highest value of 3, resulting in a +1 for the stat.

If you don’t roll any stats above +1, it means your character is not strong enough to go on adventures and would become a farmer or something similar. In that case, you should reroll all of your stats again and repeat the process until you get at least one stat above +1.

Point Buy

You have a total of 30 points, which you can spend on your stats. The higher the stat you choose, the more points you need to spend as shown in the Point Buy Table.

Point Buy Table
Stat Value Point Cost
-2
You gain 2 Points
-1
0
+0
2
+1
4
+2
6
+3
10
Examples of Stat Builds:
  • Foolish Min-Max: +3, +3, +3, -1, -1, -1

  • Balanced: +3, +2, +2, +1, 0, 0

  • Jack of All Trades: +2, +2, +2, +2, +1, 0

  • Specialized: +3, +3, +1, 0, 0, 0

  • Highly Specialized: +3, +3, +2, +1, 0, -2

Stats at higher Levels

When creating a character at higher levels, they also gain a +1 bonus to one stat everytime their Tier is increased, to a maximum bonus of +5.

Background

Your character’s background is their story before the game even begins. You could be a wizard’s apprentice embarking on an adventure to discover more knowledge, a fighter on a quest for revenge, a cleric on a holy mission for their god, or anything else you can imagine—that’s the beauty of this game!

There are two ways to determine your character’s background:

  • Create your own Background
  • Roll a Background

Create your own Background

To create your own Background, you need to follow some rules. Here are the steps:

  • Give your character some traits, objectives, and flaws. These details will make it easier to play with the character and give them an interesting dynamic.

  • Create the start of your character’s story and work with your GM to determine how this will affect the game and the character’s consequences. You only need to develop the start of the story, as you will role-play the middle and even the end of the story during the game.

  • Choose 1 Stat and justify why it is affected by your Background. This stat will receive a +1 bonus.

Roll a Background

There is a Background maker you can use to inspire you. There will be various lists detailing aspects of your character, like their origin, familiy and personality traits. You can roll on these lists to see the results, or just pick the results that you like.

This will provides you with a general idea of your character’s backstory. But don’t worry about it, the background only start – your actions in game will be much more important for the game!

In addition, based on the results of your background, you can choose one stat to gain a +1 bonus.

You can check the Background page here.

Tier

Your character’s Tier is determined by their Total Level, as indicated in the Tier Table. For instance, a Level 2 character would be in Tier 1, while a Level 7 character would be in Tier 3.

If you have multiclassed, your Total Level is used to determine your Tier. Therefore, a character with 5 Levels in the Barbarian Class and 5 Levels in the Fighter Class would be in Tier 4, as their Total Level is 10.

Tier Table
Tier Total Level Total Skill Points Max Points per Skill
1
1 to 2
8
2
2
3 to 4
16
2
3
5 to 8
24
3
4
9 to 12
32
4
5
13 to 16
40
5
6
17 to 20
48
6

Tier & Stat

When your Tier increases, you can increase one Stat you have by a bonus of +1, to a maximum stat bonus of +5.

Example: I have a Charisma stat of +2. My character just reaches a new Tier, so I can increase my Charisma to become a +3 for example. If I already had a Charisma +5, then I would need to increase another Stat of mine.

Level

At the beginning of your adventure, you will start at Level 1. As you progress through your journey, you will gain experience and Level up.

Leveling UP

When you Level up, you gain additional abilities listed on the Level you reached. The Level 20 is the maximum Total Level that your character can have.

You can also reallocate skill points you have invested when you Level up. The maximum number of skill points you can reallocate per Level up is equal to your Tier.

Your GM can choose between two ways of leveling up: the Milestone system or the XP system.

  • Milestone: Whenever the party completes a big task, mission, or any big challenge, the GM can tell that all the characters Level up. Finishing a Story Arc, or advancing in an adventure can also trigger a Level up. Your GM will be the one that decides when the characters Level up. Keep in mind that all the characters Level up at once.

  • XP: When the characters kill a creature, discover something, or manage to deal with a social interaction, your GM will reward all characters with the same XP, which is not divided. The accumulated XP will determine your character’s Level, as shown in the XP Table.

XP Table
Level Accumulated XP Tier
1
0 XP
1
2
10 XP
1
3
50 XP
2
4
150 XP
2
5
250 XP
3
6
500 XP
3
7
750 XP
3
8
1.000 XP
3
9
1.500 XP
4
10
2.000 XP
4
11
2.500 XP
4
12
3.000 XP
4
13
3.750 XP
5
14
4.500 XP
5
15
5.250 XP
5
16
6.000 XP
5
17
7.000 XP
6
18
8.000 XP
6
19
9.000 XP
6
20
10.000 XP
6

XP Adventuring Rewards

When rewarding XP outside of combat, your GM will award XP based on the combined level of the party.

If the task was easy, the XP gained will be halved (rounded down). If the task was normal, the XP will not be affected. However, if the task was hard, the XP will be doubled.

XP Adventuring Table
Difficulty XP
Easy
Half the player's combined levels
Normal
Player's Combined levels
Hard
Twice the player's combined levels

Skills

Skills are a fundamental mechanic of this game and represent your character’s proficiency in various areas.

Skill Points

Your character’s ability in a particular skill can improve through training and experience, even if they are not naturally skilled. This is represented by skill points.

At the beginning of the game, you have 8 skill points that you can allocate to improve the bonus of a skill. As you progress and reach higher Tiers, you will gain additional 8 skill points to spend, as indicated in the Tier table.

The maximum number of skill points you can have is also listed on the Tier table.

A character on Tier 1 could invest 2 skill point per skill, but a character on Tier 4 could invest up to 4 skill points on a single skill for example.

Tier Table
Tier Total Level Total Skill Points Max Points per Skill
1
1 to 2
8
2
2
3 to 4
16
2
3
5 to 8
24
3
4
9 to 12
32
4
5
13 to 16
40
5
6
17 to 20
48
6

Calculating your Skill Bonus

Your Skill Bonus is equal to the appropriate Stat + Skill Points.

Example: My Strength stat is a +3 and I have spent 2 skill points in Athletics. So in this case, my skill bonus in Athletics will be equal to +5 (3 + 2).

Versatile Skills

You will notice that some skills can be linked to more than one stat. Those are Versatile skills, and when rolling, you can choose which of the linked stats to use, as the scene calls for them!

Example: If your character has a +3 Strength and a +1 Charisma and has invested 1 skill point in Intimidation, you can have a skill bonus of +4 if you use Strength or +2 if you use Charisma when rolling for Intimidation.

Essential Skills

Some skills are very important for the life of an adventurer, like Endurance and Reflex, and so, they are called Essential Skills.

This means that every character always has the maximum amount of skill points allocated to them automatically, with those points not counting towards the total number of skill points available.

Skill List

Strength (STR)

  • Athletics
  • Brawling (STR or DEX)
  • Concentration (STR or WIS)
  • Endurance (Essential)
  • Heavy Weapons
  • Intimidation (STR or CHA)
  • Martial Weapons

Dexterity (DEX)

  • Agility
  • Brawling (STR or DEX)
  • Finesse Weapons
  • Light Weapons
  • Reflex (DEX or WIS), (Essential)
  • Sleight of Hand
  • Stealth

Intelligence (INT)

  • Arcana
  • Investigation
  • Language (INT or CHA)
  • Medicine
  • Memory
  • Nature (INT or WIS)
  • Tools Manipulation

Wisdom (WIS)

  • Concentration (STR or WIS)
  • Insight
  • Nature (INT or WIS)
  • Perception
  • Reflex (DEX or WIS), (Essential)
  • Religion (WIS or CHA)
  • Wild Handling

Charisma (CHA)

  • Bargain
  • Deception
  • Intimidation (STR or CHA)
  • Language (INT or CHA)
  • Performance
  • Persuasion
  • Religion (WIS or CHA)

Skill Rolls

When a player does something, the GM might ask them to roll on a skill to determine if you succeed or not. There are 3 types of skill rolls: Checks, Saves and Attack rolls. You use skills for all 3 types of Roll.

Take the Brawling skill as an example:

  • Check: During a Martial Arts training, you could make a Brawling Check
  • Save: If you try to escape a Grapple, you make a Brawling Save
  • Attack: If you try to punch someone, you make a Brawling Attack

Check Rolls

When your character attempts a task, the GM may ask you to make a Check roll.

To make a Check, roll a d20 and add your skill bonus to the result. If the total result is equal to or greater than the Check Difficulty Class (DC) set by the GM, you succeed in the task. If the result is lower than the DC, you fail the task.

Example: If you want to convince someone to do a favor, you would make a Persuasion Check. Rolling the d20 gives you an 8, and your Persuasion skill bonus is +5. Adding these together gives a total of 13. If the GM set the Check DC to 11, you succeed in convincing the person.

The Check DC is set by the GM, but they usually are based on the Check DC table:

Check DC Table
Difficulty Check DC
Very Easy
5
Easy
10
Medium
15
Hard
20
Very Hard
25
Almost Impossible
30

The GM will not ask you to roll for simple tasks that your character can obviously do, such as sitting on a chair. They will only request a Check if there’s a chance of failure.

Similarly, the GM will not request a Check for something that is completely impossible. For example, if you ask for your character to teleport to the moon and blow it up with one punch, your GM will probably say no. The GM will only ask for a Check if there is a possibility of success.

Save Rolls

Some abilities in the game may require you to make a Save to resist their effects.

To make a Save, roll a d20 and add the required skill bonus. If the total result equals or exceeds the Save DC, you succeed and resist the effect. If the total result is lower than the Save DC, you fail and suffer the effect. Note that you can choose to intentionally fail a Save if you wish to.

The Save DC can either be specified by the GM or determined in this way:

  • Save DC = 8 + specified skill

Example: My ability says a creature needs to make an Endurance Save against my Arcana. If I have an Arcana bonus of +5, this means that the creature needs to roll for Endurance with a Save DC of 13 (8 + 5), succeeding if the total result is 13 or higher.

Attack Rolls

During combat, your character will probably Attack.

Attacks Reaches

You cannot attack a creature that is out of your reach. Attacks can be either Melee or Ranged, each with its own reach.

Melee Reach: Melee attacks typically have a reach of 5 feet, unless specified otherwise. Moving out of the reach of a melee weapon provokes Attacks of Opportunity.

Ranged Reach: Ranged attacks have two reaches listed in parentheses. The first one is its normal reach, and the second is the far reach, whenever the Attacks is made with disadvantage. When there is a hostile creature within Melee reach of you, the Attack is also made with disadvatnage. Moving out of the reach of ranged weapons does not provoke Attacks of Opportunity.

Choosing Targets

To make an Attack choose a target within reach and roll a d20 and add your skill bonus required for that particular attack. If the result is equal to or higher than the target’s Armor Class (AC), you hit the target and deal damage. If the result is lower than the target’s AC, your attack misses and deals no damage. When an Attack deals 0 damage, it also counts as a miss.

When you hit an Attack, you deal damage to the target, which is then subtracted from their Posture or Health Points (HP). The amount of damage dealt is determined by the type of Attack made, and the target’s AC is determined by the armor they are wearing.

Example: If you make an Attack with a sword, which requires the Martial Weapon skill, you would roll a d20 and add your skill bonus to the result. If the target’s AC is 14, and your total result is 16 or higher, your Attack hits, dealing 1d10 slash damage. Suppose you then roll an 8 on the d10, in that case, you deal 8 slash damage.

Critical Hits & Critical Fails

If you roll a 20 on an Attack, it is considered a Critical Hit, dealing additional damage equal to 1d6 + your Luck stat. Conversely, if you roll very low on an Attack, it results in a Critical Fail. A Critical Fail always misses, and you must roll on the Fumble Table to determine the consequences of your misfortune. The Fumble Table is further explained in the Luck Stat section, that you can find here.

Advantage & Disadvantage

Sometimes when you roll, you may have either advantage or disadvantage. This is determined by the GM or by an ability your character or another creature may have.

When you roll with advantage, you roll 2d20 and choose the result that you want. 

When you roll with disadvantage, you roll 2d20 and use the lower result.

Advantage and disadvantage do not stack. If you have 2 instances of advantage or disadvantage on the same roll, you are affected by only one.

However, advantage and disadvantage cancel each other out. If you gain advantage on a roll, but then some other effect imposes disadvantage on the same roll, the advantage and disadvantage cancel each other, resulting in a normal roll.

If you reroll a result that was made with advantage or disadvantage, you still use the same advantage or disadvantage for the reroll.

Special Check Rolls

Some situations may require specific Checks to see if a task is successful or not.

Luck Checks

Whenever there’s a chance of a rare event happening or if there’s a chance for a rare item to appear, your GM might ask for a Luck Check to determine if you were lucky enough to experience that rare opportunity. 

Luck Checks are the only type of check that doesn’t use any skill. Instead, you just add your Luck stat to the roll.

When there are random encounters, the players decide who is going to roll the Luck Check. However, that player can only roll a Luck Check again after all other players have rolled.

Skill Challenges

When all the characters are trying to flee from a Combat, or if they are in a very tricky social situation, or when they simply try to pull off any type of crazy plans, your GM might declare a Skill Challenge. 

In those cases, just a simple Check roll is not enough to deal with complicated situations. In this case, your GM might declare a Skill Challenge! When a Skill Challenge is declared, your GM will ask for a number of successes before 3 failures. 

All the characters involved in the Skill Challenge can make Check rolls, or use any other ability that they see fit to contribute with the Challenge. As long as the GM allows it, your character can be creative enough to use any skill, spell or anything really, to contribute with the Challenge.

If a character succeeds on the Check roll to contribute, the GM adds one success to the Challenge. If a character fails to contribute, the GM adds one failure to the Challenge. Some effects can automatically succeed on a Skill Challenge, but it’s up to the GM to determine those effects.

Once the number of successes were met, the Skill Challenge was successful and the characters were able to deal with that situation. However, if 3 failures were met before the successes needed, the characters failed the Skill Challenge and weren’t able to deal with the situation.

The number of successes needed is determined by the GM, but they will normally follow the pattern of the Skill Challenge Table.

Difficulty Number of Successes needed
Easy
3
Medium
4
Hard
5
Very Hard
6
Almost Impossible
7

Skill Contests

If two or more creatures compete with each other, they make a Skill Contest to see who wins. Each of those creatures choose an appropriate Skill for the Contest, and then each creature makes a Check roll with the chosen skill. 

In case of a tie, the creature with highest Luck stat wins the contest. If they have the same Luck stat, then the creatures roll a Luck Check instead and whoever rolls higher wins.

Example: My character and a goblin are racing against each other. We are making a Skill Contest to see who wins. I chose the Athletics skill for the Contest, since racing involves running. The goblin, on the other hand, chooses the Agility skill for the Contest, since he’s able to move fast. I have an Athletics bonus of +5 and the goblin has a Agility bonus of +4. We both make the chosen Check rolls. I rolled a 12 which results in a 17 (12 + 5) and the goblin also rolled a 12, but their total result was 16 (12 + 4), so I won the race.

Group Checks

When two or more characters attempt to do the same thing, your GM may call for a Group Check. In this case, each creature makes the same Check, and if at least half of them (rounded up) succeed, then the entire group succeeds.

Example: If four players want to make a Stealth Check to avoid detection, a Group Check is made. All four of them make a Stealth Check, and if at least two of them succeed, then the whole party succeeds.

There is no need for everyone on the party to participate on the Group Check. If only 2 player’s want to make a Group Check, they could do so if possible while the others wait.

Luck Stat

Luck doesn’t have anything to do with skill. This is also true in this game. The Luck Stat doesn’t have any skill linked to it, but it affects your Critical hit Damage, your Critical Fail rate, your Luck Points and your Luck Checks.

Critical Hit Damage

If you roll a 20 on an Attack, it is considered a Critical Hit, dealing additional damage equal to 1d6 + your Luck stat.

The damage type of Critical Hits is the same as that of your Attacks. If your Attack deals multiple types of damage, you choose one of those damage types for your Critical Hits.

If you have a high Luck stat, such as a +3, your Critical Hits will deal significant damage. Conversely, if you have a -2 Luck stat, your Critical Hit damage could be as low as -1 if you roll a 1 on the 1d6. This means you’re so unlucky that your Critical Hits make you deal less damage than normal.

Luck Checks

Whenever there’s a chance of a rare event happening or if there’s a chance for a rare item to appear, your GM might ask for a Luck Check to determine if you were lucky enough to experience that rare opportunity. 

Luck Checks are the only type of check that doesn’t use any skill. Instead, you just add your Luck stat to the roll.

When there are random encounters, the character with the highest Luck stat rolls the Luck Check to determine the result of the encounter.

Luck Points

If you have a positive Luck stat, you gain Luck Points to spend during the day. You have a number of Luck Points equal to your Luck stat (minimum of 0), which are regained when you finish a Long rest.

When you fail a Check, Save or Attack, you can use 1 Luck Point to reroll the result. You must use the second result and cannot reroll it again.

Critical Fail Rate

If you roll really low on an Attack, you make a Critical Fail. 

The roll of your Critical Fail is determined by your Luck Stat, as shown in the Fail Rate Table:

Fail Rate Table
Luck Stat Critical Fail Rolls
-1 or higher
1
-2
1 or 2
-3
1 to 3
-4
1 to 4
-5
1 to 5

A Critical Fail always misses, and you roll 1d4 on the Fumble Table to see your misfortune:

Fumble Table
1d4 Misfortune Effect
1
You just miss the Attack and nothing else happens
2
You trip and fall, becoming Knocked Prone
3
You are distracted and one hostile creature can make an Attack of Opportunity against you.
4
A surge of bad Luck strikes you. You have disadvantage on your next Attack, Check or Save that you make.

Skills in Detail

Here are all the Skills in the game. Each Skill has its own unique abilities which will be now explained.

Agility (DEX)

Agility affects how well your character can evade, perform acrobatic stunts, and maintain balance in tricky situations.

Whenever your character tries to run across a sheet of ice or stay balanced on a tightrope, for example, your GM might ask you to roll an Agility Check.

Agility also affects your AC while not wearing Heavy Armor, as well as your Base speed, which will be further explained in the Combat section rules that you can find here.

Arcana (INT)

Represents your character knowledge about magic. It affects your character’s ability to interact with certain magical items, as well as to understand magical effects and how they work.

Whenever your character tries to study or just understand magical objects, creatures or phenomenons, your GM might ask you to roll an Arcana Check.

Athletics (STR)

Your character’s fitness level is represented by Athletics. It affects your ability to climb, swim, jump, run, carry heavy equipment, and perform other physically demanding tasks.

If you attempt to jump a great distance, swim against a strong current, or run at high speed, your GM might ask you to roll an Athletics Check.

Athletics also determines your Dash, Climbing/Swimming speeds, as well as your Jumps, which will be further explained in the Combat section rules that you can find here.

Bargain (CHA)

Represents how well your character is able to negotiate. It affects your ability to trade and make offers.

When negotiating a transaction, you can roll one Bargain Check to adjust the price of what you are buying or selling.

However, to initiate the negotiation, you must offer something of value, such as an item, a service, or information. If the item offered is of little value, you will have disadvantage in the Bargain Check, while offering something of great value will give you advantage.

It is important to note that the number of coins used in the transaction must always fall within the Complexity Range of the item being bought or sold. So even if you roll a high Bargain Check, the price must still fall within the appropriate range. For instance, if you’re buying or selling something that is considered Simple, the price must be within the range of 10 to 20 coins, regardless of the result of the Bargain Check.

Check the Economy rules on the Adventuring section here to see how Money is used.

Bargain Table
Bargain Check Number of Coins Changed
1-9
No Change
10-14
5
15-19
10
20-24
30
25 or more
100

Brawling (STR or DEX)

Brawling represents how well the character knows how to fight with their fists. It affects your character’s ability to brawl, as well as the damage from your Unarmed Strikes.

If you are using your Strength for the skill, it means that your character is using their physical force to attack. If you are using your Dexterity for the skill, it means that your character is using their speed and techniques to attack.

You can also use the Brawling skill to make Unarmed Strikes or Grapples. You can check the Combat here for more details.

Brawling skill is also used for Brawl weapons. There is a list with every type of Weapons in the Equipment section, which you can find here.

Some classes give you access to favorite weapons. If you’re using your favorite weapon, you also gain abilities that are exclusive to that weapon type.

Concentration (STR or WIS)

Represents how well your character can remain focused when exposed to harsh situations or after being wounded.

If you are using your Strength for the skill, it means that you are physically tough enough to withstand pain and maintain your concentration. If you are using your Wisdom for the skill, it means that you are mentally strong enough to withstand pain and maintain your concentration.

Many abilities require concentration for you to use them. If your concentration ends, the effects of the ability you were concentrating on also end. The following things can end your concentration:

  • You can only maintain concentration on one ability at a time. You lose your concentration if you use another ability that requires concentration while you’re already concentrating on something else.
  • When you take any damage, you must roll a Concentration Save. The Save DC is equal to the damage you took, to a minimum DC of 10 and a maximum DC of 20. If you fail, your concentration ends.
  • You lose your concentration if you are unconscious.
  • You can end your concentration at any time.

Deception (CHA)

Represents how well your character is able to lie. It affects your ability to hide your true intentions, convince someone with false ideas, and mislead others in general.

When your character tries to assume another identity, say something misleading, or outright lie, your GM might ask you to roll a Deception Check. The Check DC to deceive someone is equal to their Passive Insight.

Succeeding in a Deception Check doesn’t immediately make someone believe anything. They will only believe that you are an honest person telling the truth, or a mad delusional person for example.

Endurance (STR)

Endurance represents your character’s physical resilience and ability to withstand hardship. It affects your maximum HP and your ability to resist toxic effects.

You always add your Endurance bonus only once to your maximum HP. For example, if you have two levels in the Fighter class (which grants 8 HP per level) and an Endurance bonus of +5, your total HP would be 21 (8 + 8 + 5).

Many poisons and bleeding effects require an Endurance save. When your character is exposed to such effects, your GM will probably ask you to make an Endurance Save.

Endurance is an essential skill, so you always have a number of skill points invested in it equal to your tier.

Finesse Weapons (DEX)

Represents how well your character can use Finesse weapons in general.

There is a list with every type of Weapons in the Equipment section, which you can find here.

Some classes give you access to favorite weapons. If you’re using your favorite weapon, you also gain abilities that are exclusive to that weapon type.

Heavy Weapons (STR)

Represents your character’s skill in using Heavy Weapons, which are characterized by their size.

It is incredibly hard to avoid Attacks from heavy weapons due to their massive size. However because of their clunkiness, the wielders of these types of weapons also become more exposed to other Attacks. In game, this is represented by the following trait that Heavy Weapons have:

  • Heavy Weapon Trait: Before you Attack with a Heavy Weapon, you can give yourself advantage on your Attack, but all Attacks against you have advantage until your next turn if you do so.

There is a list with every type of Weapons in the Equipment section, which you can find here.

Some classes give you access to favorite weapons. If you’re using your favorite weapon, you also gain abilities that are exclusive to that weapon type.

Insight (WIS)

Insight represents your character’s ability to read other people’s intentions. It affects your ability to perceive body language, voice intonations, and small mannerisms to determine the state of that creature.

Many enchantment effects also require an Insight Save. Whenever your character is subjected to an enchantment, your GM will probably ask you to roll an Insight Save.

When your character tries to read someone’s mood or predict the next action of another creature, your GM might ask you to roll an Insight Check.

Passive Insight: Whenever someone tries to lie to you, they will need to succeed on a Deception Check with a Check DC equal to your Passive Insight. Your Passive Insight is equal to 10 + your Insight bonus.

You don’t automatically know a creature is lying if that creature fails the Deception Check. You just notice that there’s something suspect about that creature.

Intimidation (STR or CHA)

Represents how threatening your character is. It affects how well your character is able to scare someone, or how well you character is able to control others through hostile methods.

If you are using your Strength for the skill, it means that you are threatening someone with physical appearance or violence. If you are using your Charisma for the skill, it means that you are threatening someone with hostile words.

Whenever you try to threaten someone during an interrogation, or if your character tries to scare someone for example, your GM might ask you to roll for an Intimidation Check.

Investigation (INT)

Represents your character’s ability to actively search for clues. It affects your ability to find traps and hidden objects, as well as your ability to loot places and gather information.

When you search for a trap or hidden passage in a dungeon, or try to look for evidence at a crime scene, your GM might ask you to roll an Investigation Check.

A lot of illusion effects also require an Investigation Save. When your character is subjected to illusions, your GM might ask you to roll an Investigation Save.

Language (INT or CHA)

Represents your vocabulary. It affects the number of languages you know, as shown in the Language Table.

If you are using your Intelligence for the skill, it means that you have learned languages by studying them through books. If you are using your Charisma for the skill, it means that you have learned languages by talking to multiple people who eventually taught you those languages.

If your character tries to grasp the meaning of some other language they don’t understand, your GM might ask you to roll a Language Check.

Learning or forgetting languages: If your Language bonus changes, the number of languages you know could also change. This would represent your character either learning or forgetting a language, for example

Language Table
Language Bonus Number of languages
-5 or -4
You can't speak
-3 or -2
1 Language
-1 to +1
2 Languages
+2 to +4
3 Languages
+5 to +7
4 Languages
+8 to +10
8 Languages
+11 or more
All Languages
Language List

Here are all Languages you can learn. We strongly recommend that you learn the Common language, since it’s the language that most people can speak.

Standard Languages Alphabet
Common
Common
Dwarvish
Dwarvish
Elvish
Sylvan
Goblish
Orcish
Gnomish
Sylvan
Halfic
Dwarvish
Jotun
Elemental
Orcish
Orcish
Exotic Languages Alphabet
Abyssal Speech
None
Celestial Speech
Divine
Dark Common
Common
Draconic
Draconic
Elemental Speech
(Aquan, Auran, Ignan, Terran)
Elemental
Infernal Speech
Divine
Sylvan
Sylvan
Special Languages Special Trait
Braille
This is a written language that Blind creatures can read through touch.
Far Speech
This is a language that causes insanity for those who hear and understand it. It manifests itself through dreams and hallucinations.
Druidic
This is the primordial language of nature, which magically uses sounds, sight, smells and tastes to communicate vague ideas.
Sign Language
Deaf creatures can still understand this language, and you produce no sound with it
Thieves' cant
These are symbols and cryptic messages that vary from region to region. Only those who know them can understand

Light Weapons (DEX)

Represents how well your character can use Light Weapons.

Light weapons are easy to hold and because of their small weight, a creature can use both hands to attack with two different light weapons at the same time. In the game, this is represented by the following trait that Light Weapons have:

  • Light Weapon Trait: You can dual wield Light Weapons. When you Attack with a Light Weapon in one hand, you can then make a second Attack with a Light weapon on the other hand as part of the same first Attack. If the first Attack was with advantage or disadvantage, the second Attack gains the same advantage or disadvantage.

There is a list with every type of Weapons in the Equipment section, which you can find here.

Some classes give you access to favorite weapons. If you’re using your favorite weapon, you also gain abilities that are exclusive to that weapon type.

Martial Weapons (STR)

Represents how well your character can use Martial Weapons in general.

There is a list with every type of Weapons in the Equipment section, which you can find here.

Some classes give you access to favorite weapons. If you’re using your favorite weapon, you also gain abilities that are exclusive to that weapon type.

Medicine (INT)

Medicine represents your character’s medical knowledge. It affects your ability to stabilize a dying creature, diagnose and treat injuries, and perform medical procedures.

When attempting to treat any wounds, your GM may ask you to roll a Medicine Check. 

Using Med Kits also requires a Medicine Check. These kits are useful for recovering HP during long rests. 

Additionally, you can take a Bonus Action to make a Medicine Check (DC 15) to stop Bleedings.

Memory (INT)

This skill represents your character’s ability to recall information. It affects your character’s overall knowledge of lore, as well as their ability to remember information about academic research, business information, creatures, locations, and objects.

When your character tries to recall important information from a past event, object (such as its base price or utility), or a location they’ve been to before, your GM might ask you to roll a Memory Check.

You can also ask your GM for flashbacks to perform actions in the past that impact your current situation. Whenever you ask for a flashback, your GM will ask for a Memory Check to see if your character is smart enough to plan that. The further in the past and the more complex the flashback is, the higher the DC of that Memory Check.

There are a lot of effects that messes with your brain and memories that require a Memory Save. When such effects takes place, your GM might ask you to roll a Memory Save.

Nature (INT or WIS)

It affects your ability to navigate and survive in natural environments, to recall information about animals and plants, as well as your ability to hunt and track creatures in the wild.

If you are using Intelligence for the skill, it means that you have learned about nature through books and more traditional ways. If you are using your Wisdom for the skill, it means that you have learned about nature by observing the natural environments and animals around you.

When you try to recall information about a beast or natural phenomena, or simply try to hunt down a rabbit, for example, your GM might ask you to roll a Nature Check

Perception (WIS)

Represents your character’s awareness. It affects your passive perception, your ability to detect the presence of things, as well as your hearing and smelling senses.

When your character tries to hear a conversation through a wall, tries to detect something in a dark forest, or tries to spot things that are obscured or easy to miss, such as ambushes, your GM might ask you to roll a Perception Check.

Passive Perception: Whenever someone tries to hide from you, they will need to succeed on a Stealth Check with a Check DC equal to your Passive Perception. Your Passive Perception is equal to 10 + your Perception bonus.

Performance (CHA)

Represents your character’s ability to entertain an audience. It affects how well your character knows how to play music, how to dance, act or even tell a story in front of someone.

When your character presents themselves on a show, or if your character plays an instrument, your GM might ask you to roll a Performance Check.

Persuasion (CHA)

Represents your character ability to convince others. It affects your ability to friendly influence others into doing something you might want.

If your character asks for a favor, or makes a cordial request, your GM might ask you to roll a Persuasion Check.

Reflex (DEX or WIS)

Represents your character’s reaction speed. It affects your ability to react quickly to unexpected situations, as well as your maximum Posture.

If you use Dexterity for the skill, it means that your character is physically agile and can react quickly. If you use Wisdom for the skill, it means that your character is perceptive and able to react first to unexpected events.

You always add your Reflex bonus only once to your Max Posture. For example, if you have two levels in the Fighter class (which grants 4 Posture per level) and a Reflex bonus of +6, your total Posture would be 14 (4 + 4 + 6).

When your character needs to react quickly to an unexpected event, your GM might ask you to roll a Reflex Check to see if your character is able to react in time.

Effects that require a quick response will often require a Reflex Save. For example, if someone throws a lightning bolt at you, your GM will likely ask you to make a Reflex Save to avoid the attack.

Reflex is an essential skill, which means you will always have a number of skill points invested in it equal to your Tier

Religion (WIS or CHA)

Represents your character’s religious knowledge. It affects your ability to interact with gods and other powerful deities, as well as your ability to recall information about religious practices, holy (or unholy) symbols, and prayers or rites.

If you are using your Wisdom for the skill, it means that you have learned about religion by observing religious practices and hearing religious stories around you. If you are using your Charisma for the skill, it means that you are able to understand religion by interacting with other religious communities around you.

When your character tries to interact with a deity, recognize a religious symbol, or simply express its faith, your GM might ask you to roll a Religion Check.

Stealth (DEX)

Represents your character’s ability to remain unnoticed. It affects how well your character can hide from people.

When your character tries to hide from guards, your GM might ask you to roll a Stealth Check. The Check DC to hide from someone is equal to their Passive Perception. The rules for hiding will be further explained in the Combat section, which you can find here.

Hiding can also grant you a Surprise round, which can greatly affect combat as well.

Sleight of Hand (DEX)

Represents your character’s agility with their hands. It affects your ability to pickpocket, perform tricks with your hands, and conceal objects that you are carrying.

Whenever your character tries to conceal an object, cheat in a card game, or steal from someone, your GM might ask you to roll a Sleight of Hand Check.

Tools Manipulation (INT)

Tools are essential for specializing in certain tasks and can offer significant utility for you and your party. Each tool has its own unique purpose and uses. You can check all the tools here

Tools can be used with either your Tools Manipulation skill, or another specified skill. The Thief’s tools require either the Tools Manipulation skill or the Sleight of Hand skill to be used for example.

Learning or forgetting Tools: If your Tools Manipulation bonus changes, the number of tools your character knows could also change. This would represent your character either learning or forgetting how to use a tool for example.

The number of Tools you know how to use as shown in the Tools Known table:

Tools Known Table
Tools Manipulation Bonus Number of Tools Known
0 or less
No tool known
+1 or +2
1 tool known
+3 or +4
2 tools known
+5 or +6
3 tools known
+7 or +8
4 tools known
+9 or +10
5 tools known
+11 or more
6 tools known

Here is a list of all the tools you can learn:

Tools Table
Tools Skill Used
Alchemist Tools
Arcana or Tools Manipulation
Calligrapher's Tools
Sleight of Hand or Tools Manipulation
Construction's Tools
Concentration or Tools Manipulation
Cooking's Tools
Nature or Tools Manipulation
Disguise Tools
Deception or Tools Manipulation
Explorer's Tools
Nature or Tools Manipulation
Herbalist Tools
Nature or Tools Manipulation
Hunter's Tools
Nature or Tools Manipulation
Medicine Tools
Medicine or Tools Manipulation
Musician Tools
Performance or Tools Manipulation
Poisoner's Tools
Nature or Tools Manipulation
Smith's Tools
Concentration or Tools Manipulation
Spellcraft Tools
Arcana or Tools Manipulation
Thief's Tools
Sleight of Hand or Tools Manipulation

Wild Handling (WIS)

Represents your character’s ability to communicate with wild creatures. It affects your ability to domesticate beasts, read a wild creature’s mood, keep mounts calm, or influence a creature that doesn’t speak.

When you try to calm a wolf, determine if a bear is angry, or domesticate a bird, your GM might ask you to roll a Wild Handling Check.

Senses

  • Dark Vision: The creature can see in the dark and is not partially or completely blinded in dark places. While doing so, it cannot see any colors, except for black and white.
  • Blind Sense: The creature is immune to being partially or completely blinded. It can manifest as tremor sense, sonar, wave sense, magic, and others.
  • Ethereal Vision: The creature is able to perceive things in the Ethereal dimension. This can include ghosts and other immaterial creatures.
  • True Vision: The creature can see through any visual effect and can discern any sound effect made by an illusion.