Combat

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Contents

Rounds & Turns

Combat is a chaotic situation where multiple creatures fight with multiple abilities at the same time. To represent this chaotic scene, combat is organized in rounds, with each round taking about 6 seconds.

During each round, every creature that is participating in the combat takes one turn. During your turn, you can move, take actions and bonus actions, and even reactions. You can’t do anything during other creatures’ turns, except by using your reaction.

Once a round ends, a new round starts with the same turn order as the first round. Combat ends only if all hostile creatures are either defeated or surrendered, or if a creature tries to flee from the combat. In that case, your GM will probably declare a skill challenge.

Initiative

So, how does combat start? With Initiative, of course!

At the start of combat, every creature involved rolls a special check called Initiative. Typically, you roll a Reflex Check for Initiative, but there can be situations where you could use a Stealth Check if you were hiding, or Athletics if you were running when the Combat starts. The GM will always determine which skill is going to be used for Initiative when the Combat starts.

In case of a tie, the creature with highest Luck stat goes first. If they have the same Luck stat, then the creatures roll a Luck Check instead and whoever rolls higher goes first.

Dynamic Rounds

Combats can suddenly change. During the start of a round, new creatures can join the Combat, or environment changes can appear in the battlefield. If a new creature appears, that creature rolls for Initiative, possibly changing the turns order.

Surprise Rounds

When a group of characters wants to make a stealthy attack without being noticed, they all make a Group Stealth Check against the creature with the highest Passive Perception among those unaware creatures before combat starts.

If they succeed on this Group Stealth Check, a Surprise Round happens, where all the surprised creatures don’t get a turn to act.

What can you do in Combat:

During your turn, you have your movement, 1 Action, 1 Bonus Action and 1 Reaction.

Also, you have Free Actions, which can be used as many times as you want.

Actions

Here are the Actions you can perform:

Attack

During combat, your character will probably Attack.

Attacks Reaches

You cannot attack a creature that is out of your reach. Attacks can be either Melee or Ranged, each with its own reach.

Melee Reach: Melee attacks typically have a reach of 5 feet, unless specified otherwise. Moving out of the reach of a melee weapon provokes Attacks of Opportunity.

Ranged Reach: Ranged attacks have two reaches listed in parentheses. The first one is its normal reach, and the second is the far reach, whenever the Attacks is made with disadvantage. When there is a hostile creature within Melee reach of you, the Attack is also made with disadvatnage. Moving out of the reach of ranged weapons does not provoke Attacks of Opportunity.

Choosing Targets

To make an Attack choose a target within reach and roll a d20 and add your skill bonus required for that particular attack. If the result is equal to or higher than the target’s Armor Class (AC), you hit the target and deal damage. If the result is lower than the target’s AC, your attack misses and deals no damage. When an Attack deals 0 damage, it also counts as a miss.

When you hit an Attack, you deal damage to the target, which is then subtracted from their Posture or Health Points (HP). The amount of damage dealt is determined by the type of Attack made, and the target’s AC is determined by the armor they are wearing.

Example: If you make an Attack with a sword, which requires the Martial Weapon skill, you would roll a d20 and add your skill bonus to the result. If the target’s AC is 14, and your total result is 16 or higher, your Attack hits, dealing 1d10 slash damage. Suppose you then roll an 8 on the d10, in that case, you deal 8 slash damage.

Critical Hits & Critical Fails

If you roll a 20 on an Attack, it is considered a Critical Hit, dealing additional damage equal to 1d6 + your Luck stat. Conversely, if you roll very low on an Attack, it results in a Critical Fail. A Critical Fail always misses, and you must roll on the Fumble Table to determine the consequences of your misfortune. The Fumble Table is further explained in the Luck Stat section, that you can find here.

Dodge (Concentration)

All Attacks against you have disadvantage and you gain advantage on Agility, Brawling and Reflex Saves. This Concentration lasts until the start of your next turn.

You can only use Dodge during combat.

Grapple

If you have at least one free hand, you can use your Action to Grapple a target within 5 feet of you. The target must then succeed on a Brawling Save against your own Brawling or become grappled by you. The following effects then happens:

  • The target becomes immobilized while grappled by you.
  • You can drag the target that you are grappling when you move, but you are considered to be in harsh terrain unless the target is two or more sizes smaller than you.
  • The target can use 1 Action to repeat the Brawling Save, escaping your grapple on a success.

You cannot grapple a target that is two or more sizes larger than you. The grapple ends earlier if you release the target as a Free Action.

Hide

If you are in a dangerous situation, it may be better to hide.

You make 1 Stealth Check (DC is equal to the highest Passive Perception among the creatures you are trying to hide). If the creatures are already aware of your presence, you make this Check with disadvantage.

On a success, you hide. On a fail, the creatures can still see you. If you Attack a creature while Hiding, that creature becomes Surprised for that Attack.

You reveal your position to any creatures after you Attack or cast a spell. If you use your movement, you need to repeat this Stealth Check and remain out of sight to not get spotted.

A creature can still Use the Environment/ Object to try to find you.

Your GM always determines if it’s possible to hide. To properly hide, there must be some type of cover you can take.

Hold Action (Concentration)

You can use your Action to wait for the right time to act.

When you hold your action, you need to specify a trigger, such as a door opening or a hostile creature coming near you. When that trigger occurs, you can take an Action, but you cannot cast Normal Spells with it. This is considered an Action for the purposes of any abilities.

This Concentration lasts until the start of your turn, or until you release that Action.

You can only use Hold Action during combat.

Use Environment/ Object

You can use your Action to use the environment or objects around you.

Picking a weapon from the ground, pushing a lever, or drinking a potion are examples of using objects.

Shaking a pillar or attempting to cause an avalanche are examples of using the environment.

If you search for a hiding creature in the environment, make 1 Perception Save against the Stealth of that creature, spotting it on a success.

Bonus Action

Here is all you can do with your Bonus Actions:

Dash

During your turn, you can use your Bonus Action to Dash. When you Dash, you add your Dash speed to your Base speed until the end of your turn. However, after Dashing, you can only move in one direction until the end of your turn.

Your Dash speed is determined by your Athletics skill as shown here.

Disengage

You can also move more carefully to avoid Attacks of opportunity and escape if necessary.

You can use your Bonus action to Disengage. When you Disengage, standing up and using your movement does not trigger Attacks of Opportunity until the end of your turn, but you become in harsh terrain until the end of your turn as well.

A creature can still make an Attack of Opportunity if your Posture is reduced to 0, regardless if you Disengage or not.

Shove

As a Bonus Action, you can Shove 1 creature within 5 feet of you. That creature must then succeed on a Brawling Save against your Brawling, or be pushed 5 feet away from you.

You cannot Shove creatures larger than you.

Mount/ Dismount

You can mount a creature that is at least one size larger than you that is within 5 feet of you.

You and the mounted creature share the same space. When the mounted creature moves, you move with it. If the mounted creature is Knocked Prone, you dismount it and become Knocked Prone too. You also gain advantage to all your Attacks against a creature you are mounting.

If the creature is unwilling to be mounted, you must make a Brawling Save against the Athletics of that creature. On a success, you mount that creature, but on a fail, you dismount it and become Knocked Prone. You must repeat this Save at the start of your turns while you are mounted.

If the mounted creature is willing and has not taken any actions this round, you may both act during the same turn.

Reaction

Reactions are used as a quick response that your character can do in Combat.

You have 1 Reaction to use and regain that Reaction during the start of your turn.

Attacks of Opportunity

When a creature uses its movement to leave your Melee reach or if a creature Posture is reduced to 0, you can use your Reaction to make a Melee Attack against it.

There are many effects that can move a creature against its will. If a creature moves out of your weapon’s reach due to such an effect, it does not provoke an Attack of Opportunity. Attacks of Opportunity are only triggered when a creature uses its own movement.

A Knocked Prone creature standing up triggers both Melee and Ranged Attacks of Opportunity, unless they Disengage.

Keep in mind that there are other effects that can also provoke Attacks of Opportunity.

Use Shields

If you are using a Shield, you probably want to use your Reaction to defend from Attacks.

Whenever an Attack would hit you, you can use your Reaction to gain the Active AC bonus of the shield to your normal AC, potentially making that Attack miss instead.

Some shields also have Passive AC while you are wearing them. This Passive AC is always specified by the Shield. 

You can find all the available Shields here.

Free Actions

Some things can be done without taking an action.

You can take as many Free Actions as you want in your turn. They are in fact for free.

Influence

Once per round, you can attempt to influence another creature with a Free Action, using a smart argument, sheer intimidation, or any other possible means.

To influence a creature, you must share a language with it. Then, you make a Check using any skill linked to the Charisma stat. If it is a Versatile skill, you can still choose which of the two stats to use. 

If the creature does not speak any languages, you must make a Wild Handling Check instead. 

If you or any of your companions do anything harmful to it, the creature also becomes hostile again.

The Check DC is equal to the creature’s Passive Insight. Your GM can grant advantage or disadvantage on that Check depending on the situation and the skill used. Additionally, depending on the creature and situation, your GM may rule that the creature cannot be influenced.

On a success, the creature’s attitude temporarily increases by 1. If the creature attitude would become friendly, it instead remains neutral, but it also stops fighting.

On a failure, the creature’s attitude immediately returns to hostile.

The attitudes are:

  • Companion Attitude
  • Friendly Attitude
  • Neutral Attitude
  • Unfriendly Attitude
  • Hostile Attitude

You can learn more about it here.

Switch Shield or Weapons

A creature can quickly switch weapons during a battle.

Once per round, you can switch Shields or Weapons as a Free Action. You must be carrying the weapon to use this Free Action. If the weapon is on the ground, you would need to Use Environment/ Object Action to pick it up.

Movement & Terrain

During combat, you will probably want to move and position yourself in a good place for your Attacks or to not get hit.

Using Movement

All creatures have a total movement speed that is determined by either their Athletics skill or Agility skill, depending on the terrain they are currently on.

A creature can spend its movement at any time during its turns, and doesn’t need to use all of its movement at once. The creature can first move a little, then make an Action, then move again, and then make a Bonus Action for example.

There are multiple types of speed, such as a swimming speed and climbing speed. You always use the appropriate type of speed that matches the terrain you currently are on.

Example: My Character has a Walking Speed of 30 feet and a swimming speed of 15 feet. During my turn in combat, I can walk up to a maximum of 30 feet per turn. However, if my character is currently underwater, they would only be able to swim up to a maximum of 15 feet per turn.

Base Speed

The Walking Speed is always considered your character Base speed. 

Some races and abilities grant you access to other types of speed to be considered your base speed. Fishes have the Swimming speed as their Base speed, and birds have the Flying speed as their base speed, for example.

Your Base speed is defined by your Agility skill as shown here.

Swimming and Climbing Speeds

Whenever you are underwater, you use your swimming speed instead of your walking speed. Similarly, whenever you are climbing, you use your climbing speed instead of your walking speed.

If nothing specifies otherwise, your Swimming or Climbing speeds are not considered your Base Speed.

Your Climbing and Swimming speeds are defined by the Athletics skill, as shown in here.

Other types of Base speeds

Some other types of creatures, such as fishes or birds, have other base speeds instead of walking speed. Fishes have the Swimming speed as their Base speed, and birds have the Flying speed as their base speed, for example.

If a creature has the Swimming speed as their Base speed, instead of using its Athletics skill to determine its Swimming speed, that creature would use its Agility skill to determine its swimming speed, like shown on the Base Speed Table.

Dash Speed

During your turn, you can use your Bonus Action to Dash. When you Dash, you add your Dash speed to your Base speed until the end of your turn. However, after Dashing, you can only move in one direction until the end of your turn.

Note that when you Dash, it only increases your Base speed. If your current terrain is underwater and your Base speed is not your Swimming speed, your Dash won’t increase your Swimming speed.

Your Dash speed is determined by your Athletics skill as shown in here.

Jumping

When you jump, you can choose to make either a high jump or a long jump. Jumping still consumes your total movement speed, as if you had switched speeds.

Your maximum jump distance is determined by your Athletics skill, as shown in here.

Running Jump

If you use your Dash and move at least 20 feet during your turn, you can double your Jumps.

Long Jump

The height of your Long Jump doesn’t matter, such as when you’re jumping across a stream or chasm. Your GM might ask you to make an Agility or Athletics Check to clear an obstacle during the Jump.

High Jump

During a High Jump, you can pull your arms up to reach an extra 2 feet if necessary. You won’t take any fall damage when landing after a High Jump unless you fall more than the distance you initially jumped.

Switching Speeds

You can switch back and forth between your speeds during your move. Whenever you switch, subtract the distance you’ve already moved from your new speed. The result determines how much farther you can move. If the result is 0 or less, you can’t use the new speed during the current turn.

Example: Your character has a walking speed of 30 feet and a swimming speed of 15 feet. If your character swims 10 feet and then goes back to the ground, you would subtract 10 feet from your walking speed, leaving you with 20 feet left to move on the ground.

Falling

Jumping from high places may not be a great idea.

At the end of the turn that you fall, you descend up to 300 feet to the ground. When you hit the ground, you take 1d10 strike damage for each 10 feet that you fell.

You that can fly can also use a Reaction to stop itself from falling. 

You don’t take fall damage when landing after a jump, unless you fell more than the distance you initially jumped.

Getting Prone

You can willingly become Knocked Prone as a Free Action, but you must spend 15 feet of movement to stand up again.

Standing up triggers both Melee and Ranged Attacks of Opportunity, unless you Disengage.

You can find more about Knocked Prone on conditions.

Types of Terrain

Harsh Terrain

A harsh terrain is characterized by being full of obstacles that make it harder to move through.

Terrains with a lot of snow, overgrown vegetation, or something like stairs are considered harsh terrain. Whenever you are in harsh terrain, your speed is halved, meaning that you need to spend 2 feet of movement to move 1 foot.

Example: If you have a walking speed of 30 feet and move through harsh terrain, you would only be able to move 15 feet, since moving 1 foot requires 2 feet of movement in harsh terrain.

Fast Terrain

A fast terrain is characterized by speeding things up, making it much easier to move.

Terrains like downhills or slides are considered fast terrains.

Whenever you are in fast terrain, your movement speed is doubled, meaning that for each 1 foot of movement that you spend, you actually move 2 feet.

Example: Since I’m moving in fast terrain, I can spend 30 feet of my walking movement to actually move 60 feet

Fast & Harsh Terrain Interactions

Harsh Terrain does not stack. If there are two effects that create harsh terrain, only one of those effects applies. The same applies to fast terrains. If there are two effects that create fast terrain, only one of those effects applies.

However, fast and harsh terrain cancel each other out. If there’s a harsh terrain, but then some effect would transform that terrain into a fast terrain, the harsh terrain and fast terrain cancel each other, resulting in a normal terrain.

In some cases, your GM might want to use the Dynamic Terrain rule instead to represent the situation better.

Dynamic Terrain (Optional)

This is an optional rule, which your GM can use or not. In some cases, there can be both fast terrain and harsh terrain at the same time depending on the direction that you move.

If you are moving in the same direction a strong wind is blowing, you would be in a fast terrain, but if you move in the opposite direction a strong wind is blowing, you would be in a harsh terrain for example.

In these cases, these terrain effects might not cancel each other out, and it’s up to the GM to decide how they interact.

Map Grid Rules (Optional)

This is an optional rule, which your GM can use or not. A lot of maps are divided by squares, with each square representing 5 feet. In case a creature has less than 5 feet of movement left, that creature can still move one square by spending all of its remaining movement.

Example: My character has 2 feet of their movement speed left. They can still spend those 2 feet of movement speed to move one square on the map, even if it would normally spend 5 feet of movement speed.

Burrow Speed

Creatures with a burrow speed can move underground, but they must follow certain rules:

  • A creature with a burrow speed can spend its movement to travel underground. While underground, the creature is considered to have full cover. However, others can still track the creature by following the hole it leaves behind in the ground.

Being Underwater

Creatures that have a swimming speed can move underwater. Most creatures that can breathe underwater also have a swimming speed as their Base speed. There are some rules that need to be followed while underwater:

  • A creature that can swim is able to spend movement to move in any direction. The only difference in mechanics is that you also have to account for creatures being in a higher or lower position than you.

  • A creature can remain underwater without breathing for about 1 minute. After that, the creature starts to Suffocate. The Suffocate condition will be explained in the conditions sections. A creature that can breathe underwater is not affected by this.

  • All creatures underwater gain resistance to fire damage.

  • All creatures have disadvantage on their Attack rolls, unless they are using a weapon with the aquatic trait.

  • If you are using a Ranged Weapon, both the normal and far reach distance are halved (rounded down).

Climbing

Creatures that have a climbing speed can climb their way through climbable surfaces.There are some rules that need to be followed while climbing:

  • A creature that can climb is able to spend movement to go in any direction. The only difference in mechanics is that you also have to account creatures being in a higher or lower position than you.

  • If you are Knocked Prone, you start falling to the ground.

  • A creature must have at least one free hand to climb.

  • Some surfaces are too smooth to be climbable. Your GM always determines if the surface is climbable or not.

Spider Climb

Some creatures have spider climb, which allows them to climb any surfaces without requiring free hands.

Flying in the Air

Creatures that are able to fly use their flying speed to move through the air. There are some rules that need to be followed while flying:

  • A creature that can fly is able to spend movement to go in any direction. The only difference in mechanics is that you also have to account creatures being in a higher or lower position than you.
  • You need to move at least 15 feet with your flying speed to keep yourself from falling.
  • If you are Knocked Prone, you start falling to the ground.
  • A creature that is falling can spend a Reaction to stop falling. A creature could jump from a really high place, and descend 300 feet in one turn, but then use a Reaction to stop itself from hitting the ground, making a cool Sky Dive.
  • You cannot use your Flying Speed while you are grappling a creature, unless the creature you are grappling is smaller than you.

Hover

Some creatures can Hover in the air. They don’t need to spend 15 feet of flying movement to remain in the air.

Creature Size

Different creatures have different sizes. There are a total of 7 sizes a creature can have as shown in the Size Table.

Size Table
Size Space Occupies
Tiny
2 feet by 2 feet or less
Small
5 feet by 5 feet
Medium
5 feet by 5 feet
Large
10 feet by 10 feet
Enormous
15 feet by 15 feet to 20 feet by 20 feet
Gigantic
25 feet by 25 feet to 45 feet by 45 feet
Colossal
50 feet by 50 feet or more

Size Comparison

Some effects can compare different sizes to determine their viability. When comparing sizes, you need to determine how many size categories a creature needs to grow or decrease to match the size of another creature.

Example: If you compare a Tiny creature with a Large one, the Tiny creature is three size categories smaller than the Large creature.

Squeezing

A creature can squeeze to enter in a smaller space that a creature one size smaller than it could enter. However, a creature that is squeezed becomes Contained and it’s considered to be in harsh terrain.

Moving through other Creature Space

You can move through another friendly creature’s space with no problems. However, to move through a hostile creature space, you need to be 2 sizes smaller, or larger than that hostile creature. You can never end your turn in the space of another creature, unless you are mounted in it.

Keep in mind that if you don’t disengage, you can trigger an Attack of Opportunity if you leave a hostile creature reach.

Posture / HP / Damage

All creatures have Posture and Health Points (HP), which represent their total capacity to remain in a fight.

When your character takes damage, you first reduce its Posture by the amount of damage it took. While Posture is being used, your character is not being wounded. It is just evading attacks which drains its energies.

Once the Posture is reduced to 0 is consider broken, you then start to reduce the HP. Any excess damage you take after your Posture is reduced to 0 is subtracted by your HP. If your Posture is reduced to 0, one creature can make a Melee Attack of Opportunity against you if possible.

Once you finish a Short or Long rest, you completely replenish your Posture.

The Bleed, Brain and Poison damage types ignore your Posture, directly reducing your HP.

Death

Once you reach 0 HP, your character immediately dies even if they had some Posture left.

If a creature reduces someone to 0 HP with a Melee Attack, that creature can knock that target unconscious without killing it, leaving it Unconscious instead.

Death Save (Optional)

If you feel like you die on 0 HP is too extreme, you can use the optional Death Save rule instead.

When you reach 0 HP, you must roll 1 Endurance Save. The Save DC is equal to the damage you took, to a minimum DC of 10 and a maximum DC of 20. If you fail, you die. On a success, you become Unconscious with 0 HP instead.

If you take any damage while Unconscious and with 0 HP, you die. If you regain HP, you then stop being Unconscious.

Non-Lethal Combat

During ring fights, or bar brawls, or any other non-lethal combat scenarios where the aim is not to kill but to subdue or just hurt the other person, instead of dropping the person to 0 HP, the fight ends when the Posture reaches 0.

Combat ceases immediately when a creature’s Posture is broken, signifying that the individual is overwhelmed, disoriented, or incapacitated to a point where they can no longer effectively defend themselves or pose a threat.

Armor Class (AC)

All creatures have an Armor Class (in short AC), which represents the difficulty to hit the creature with Attacks.

When you make an Attack, roll a d20 and add the skill bonus required for the Attack. If the result is equal or higher than the AC of the target you attacked, you hit the Attack. If the result is lower, you miss the Attack and deal no damage.

Armor Protection (AP)

A creature wearing good armor gains extra protection.

Before they receive any slash, strike or thrust damages, they reduce the damage by their AP first

Example: If a creature has 3 AP and takes 10 Slash damage, the damage is reduced by 3 to a total of 7.

Taking Cover

You can use the terrain in your favor and take cover to protect yourself. When you take cover, your AC can’t be below a specified number, depending on how much cover you have.

If your AC is currently lower than that certain number, you gain a bonus to your AC to match that number. If your AC is higher than that certain number, it doesn’t change.

You also gain advantage on Agility Saves if you are in Light Cover, and you automatically succeed on Agility Saves if you are in Heavy Cover. If you are in Full Cover, you are not even affected by the effect that imposes the Agility Save.

You only gain these benefits when an attack or other effect comes from the opposite side of the cover.

Cover Table
Type of Cover Minimum AC Agility Save
Light Cover
15
Advantage
Heavy Cover
20
Automatic Success
Full Cover
Can't get hit
Not affected

Light Cover

Light Cover can be anything that covers about half of the body. If you are behind a small tree, a fence or another creature that is one size larger than you, it could be considered as Light Cover.

Heavy Cover

Medium cover can be anything that covers about three quarters of the body. If you are behind a normal tree, a high stone fence or even a creature two sizes larger than you, it could be considered Medium Cover.

Full Cover

Full Cover is when your body is completely concealed and a creature has no sight of you. If you are behind a concrete wall, a giant tree, or a creature that is three or more sizes larger than you, it is considered Full Cover.

Area Effects

There are only 3 types of areas that an effect can have. They can be within a target, in front of a target, or in a Line.

Within

All the creatures inside the area are affected.

Example: All creatures within 10 feet of you must succeed on a Reflex Save against your Endurance, or take 1d8 sonic damage.

In Front

All the creatures in front of your character are affected. The width and length of this area are always specified.

Example: All creatures in a 5 feet wide and 15 feet long area in front of you must succeed on a Reflex Save against your Endurance, or take 1d8 sonic damage.

In a Line

When an effect takes place in an area in a line, the area affected is the straight path between two points in space. The width and length of the line formed are always specified.

Example: Choose two points within 30 feet of you to form a line. All creatures within 10 feet of that line must succeed on a Reflex Save against your Endurance, or take 1d8 electric damage.

Concentration

Many abilities require concentration for you to use them. If your concentration ends, the effects of the ability you were concentrating on also end. The following things can end your concentration:

  • You can only maintain concentration on one ability at a time. You lose your concentration if you use another ability that requires concentration while you’re already concentrating on something else.
  • When you take any damage, you must roll a Concentration Save. The Save DC is equal to the damage you took, to a minimum DC of 10 and a maximum DC of 20. If you fail, your concentration ends.
  • You lose your concentration if you are unconscious.
  • You can end your concentration at any time.

Flanking (Optional)

A creature can be flanked by its enemies, which will make it easier to be hit.

All melee Attacks against flanked creatures gain advantage.

A creature is flanked only when there are two or more hostile enemies, each of them on opposite sides or corners from that creature that is being flanked.

In addition, those hostile enemies cannot be 2 or more sizes smaller than the flanked creature.

Surrounded (Optional)

A creature can be surrounded with no way to properly move, making it much easier to be hit.

All attacks against surrounded creatures have advantage. A creature is considered surrounded only if there is no space for it to use any of its movement.

Types of Damage

There are a total of 15 types of damage, each fitting in one specific category. The damage types and categories are as shown in the list below. 

Physical Damage
  • Slash Damage
  • Strike Damage
  • Thrust Damage
Elemental Damage
  • Fire Damage
  • Electric Damage
  • Cold Damage
Magical Damage
  • Dark Damage
  • Force Damage
  • Light Damage
Uncommon Damages
  • Acid Damage
  • Sonic Damage
  • Psychic Damage
Posture-Bypassing Damage
  • Bleed Damage
  • Brain Damage
  • Poison Damage

Damage types in Detail

Each damage type fits on a specific category of damages. This category’s purpose is only for you to better understand what each type of damage represents in the game.

Physical types of Damage

Represents damage that inflicts a direct wound in the body. Hits from a sword or arrow normally do physical damage.

  • Slash Damage: Represents the damage taken from Attacks that are able to cut things or slice you in half. Swords are a classic example for a weapon that deals slash damage.
  • Strike Damage: Represents the damage taken from Attacks that are able to smash things or break your bones. Clubs are a classic example for a weapon that deals strike damage
  • Thrust Damage: Represents the damage taken from Attacks that are able to pierce things or make holes in your body. Arrows are a classic example for a weapon that deals thrust damage.
Elemental types of Damage

Represents damage that comes from natural energy. Things like fire and electricity do elemental damage.

  • Fire Damage: Represents the damage taken from burns. Things like melting metal normally do fire damage.
  • Electrical Damage: Represents the damage from electricity. Things like lightning deal electrical damage.
  • Cold Damage: Represents the damage taken from freezing. Things like snow can deal Cold damage.
Magical Types of Damage

Represents damage that comes from supernatural energy. Pulses of dark energy and light beams do magical damage.

  • Dark Damage: Represents the damage taken from unholy magic, usually related to fiends, witches and monsters.
  • Force Damage: Represents the damage taken from raw magic, usually related to arcane spells and effects.
  • Light Damage: Represents the damage taken from holy magic, usually related to divine spells and effects.
Uncommon Types of Damage

Represents damages that are not dealt very often and are unique in some form.

  • Acid Damage: Represents the damage taken from acid and other corroding substances. Acid damage is usually related to the Corroded Condition, which will be explained in the conditions sections.
  • Sonic Damage: Represents the damage taken from powerful sonic waves, like loud noises or shockwaves. Creatures that are deafened become immune to sonic damage.
  • Psychic Damage: Represents the damage taken from mental stress, which takes many forms. Creatures that take too much psychic damage become more desperate and vulnerable. If a creature dies from psychic damage, it could be interpreted that the stress caused a heart Attack on the creature for example.
Posture-Bypassing Damage

Represents damage that completely bypasses Posture, directly reducing HP.

  • Bleed Damage: Represents the damage taken from losing blood or any vital substance for your body. Bleed damage also ignores Posture.
  • Brain Damage: Represents the damage taken that directly affects the brain. Normally this damage comes with a negative effect that affects the creature. Brain damage also ignores Posture.
  • Poison Damage: Represents the damage taken from poisonous substances, which could vary to something like alcohol or a snake venom. Poison damage also ignores Posture.

Damage Immunity

A creature that is immune takes 0 damage from that type.

Example: The Abyssal Fiend is immune to Fire damage. If the Abyssal Fiend takes 100 fire damage, since he is immune to it, he would actually take 0 fire damage.

Damage Resistance

A creature with resistance takes half the damage (rounded down) from that damage type.

Example: The Barbarian has resistance to Slash damage and it also has 2 AP. When it takes 13 slash damage, it would first subtract from the AP, leaving it only 11 slash damage. Then, since it has slash resistance, the Barbarian would halve the damage, taking only 5 damage.

Damage Weakness

A creature with weakness doubles the damage from that type

Example: The Abyssal Fiend is weak against light damage. If the Abyssal Fiend takes 9 light damage, since he is weak against it, he would actually take 18 light damage (9 times 2).

Damage Interactions

Damage resistance or weakness is always calculated last. First, you subtract the AP from the damage, and then you apply effects that halve or double the damage.

Resistance and weakness do not stack. If you gain two resistances to the same type of damage, you are affected by only one of those effects. The same applies to weakness.

However, resistance and weakness cancel each other out. If you gain resistance to one type of damage, but then some other effect imposes weakness to that same type of damage, they cancel each other, resulting in normal damage.

Immunity is not affected by weakness. If some effect imposes weakness to a type of damage you are immune to, you will still take 0 damage from it.

Double Posture Damage

Some effects can deal twice as much damage against Posture. 

Double Posture damage does not stack. If multiple effects multiply your posture damage, you only use 1 effect.

Double Posture damage does not transfer to HP. Any excess damage that is multiplied by such effects are first halved before subtracting from the HP.

Conditions

There are multiple Conditions that can affect your character in multiple ways. Here is a list of all Conditions categorized in the game. The categories have the only purpose to organize these Conditions for better understanding.

Physical Conditions

These Conditions are related to the physical state of a creature.

Contained

While Contained, you have disadvantage on all your Attacks, and all Attacks against you gain advantage.

In addition, you cannot cast Normal Spells while contained.

Disarmed

When you are Disarmed, all Weapons or Items you are holding are dropped to the ground. Shields cannot be Disarmed, unless an effect specifies it.

Exhausted

While Exhausted, the following effects happen: 

  • You cannot use your Concentration, Reactions or Posture
  • Your Passive Perception/ Passive Insight is reduced by 5

If you don’t sleep for 2 or more nights, you become Exhausted. If you remain more than three days without any sleep, you become Unconscious for one whole day. Finishing a Long rest cures the Exhausted condition.

Immobilized

While Immobilized, your speed becomes 0, and you cannot increase your speed in any way possible.

In addition, you also gain disadvantage on all your Agility and Brawling Saves.

Knocked Prone

While Knocked Prone, you have disadvantage on all your Melee Attacks and you are considered to be in harsh terrain.

All Melee Attacks against you gain advantage, but all Ranged Attacks against you have disadvantage. You can willingly become Knocked Prone as a Free Action, but you must spend 15 feet of movement to stand up again.

Standing up triggers both Melee and Ranged Attacks of Opportunity, unless you Disengage.

Stunned

You lose all your Posture. If you didn’t have any Posture left, you instead become Immobilized for 1 turn.

Paralyzed

While Paralyzed, the following things happen:

  • You cannot use any Actions, Bonus Actions, Reactions, or even Free Actions.
  • You fail any Agility, Brawling and Reflexes Saves.
  • You also become Immobilized.
  • All Attacks against you gain advantage.

Unconscious

While Unconscious, you are both Paralyzed and Knocked Prone, and you also become unaware of your surroundings.

Mind Conditions

These Conditions are related to the mind state of creatures.

Confused

While Confused, you have the following downsides:

  • You become hostile to all creatures
  • You must use all your Actions to Attack random targets in your reach. If you don’t have any other targets to Attack, you instead Attack yourself, automatically hitting that Attack.
  • You cannot use your Concentration.

You must make a Memory Save (DC 15) during the end of your turns, or when you take any damage. On a success, the Confused condition ends.

A creature can use 1 Action to make a Persuasion Check (DC 10), making you stop being Confused on a success.

Enchanted

While Enchanted, you cannot Attack or do anything harmful to the target you are enchanted by.

Your Passive Insight is also reduced by 10 for that target, and that target also gains advantage on any skill Checks linked to the Charisma stat to interact with you.

Scared

While Scared, the source of your fear deals double Posture damage against you.

If you have 0 Posture, you instead have disadvantage on Attacks against the source of your fear.

Senses Condition

These Conditions are related to the senses.

Partially Blinded

You become partially Blinded while in dark places, where you cannot see very well. A creature with Blind Senses is immune to being partially Blinded.

While Partially Blinded, the following things happen: 

  • Your Passive Perception is reduced by 5.
  • You have disadvantage on Reflex and Perception Checks or Saves

Completely Blinded

You become completely Blinded in absolute darkness, or in places where you can see nothing. A creature with Blind senses is immune to being completely Blinded.

While completely Blinded, the following things happen: 

  • You have disadvantage on all your Attacks, and all Attacks against you have advantage
  • You fail any Reflex and Perception Checks or Saves
  • Your Passive Perception is reduced by 10
  • You cannot use Reactions.

Deafened

While Deafened, you fail to do anything that requires any hearing and your Passive Perception is reduced by 5. You also become immune to sonic damage.

Surprised

While Surprised, the following things happen:

  • You cannot use Reactions
  • All Attacks against you have advantage.
  • You double any Posture damage you take

You become Surprised by any creature that is hiding or during a Surprise round if you were ambushed.

You stop being Surprised after the creature Attacks you, or after you take damage from the hiding creature.

Wounding Conditions

These Conditions are related to effects that are considered very harmful.

Bleeding

While Bleeding, you take a specified bleed damage at the start of your turns, or every time you Dash. This bleed damage is in parentheses next to the Bleeding Condition.

Example: That target must succeed on an Endurance Save against your Light Weapon skill, or start Bleeding (1d6).

The Bleeding condition ends when you regain any HP, if you take any fire damage or if a creature uses its Bonus Action to make Medicine Check (DC 15) and succeeds.

Bleeding does not stack. When there are two effects that make a creature start Bleeding, you use the effect that deals more bleed damage.

Keep in mind that bleed damage ignores Posture.

Corroded

Only Constructs or Objects can have this Condition. There are Corrosion points that affect types of objects in a different way as shown in the Corrosion Table:

Corrosion Table
Type of Item Corrosion point
Armor
- 1 AP per Corrosion point
Shield
-1 AC Bonus per Corrosion point
Weapon
-1 damage per Corrosion point
Construct
-5 Max HP per Corrosion point

Shields can have an Active AC or Passive AC Bonus. You first subtract the Passive AC Bonus for each Corrosion point. If the Passive AC Bonus is 0, you then start subtracting the Active AC Bonus for each Corrosion point of the Shield.

If a Corrosion point would reduce a Construct Max HP to 0, that Construct then instantly dies.

You can remove all Corrosion points by fixing the equipment with the Smith’s Tools.

Cursed

While Cursed, you are subjected by a specific effect detailed by the Curse. You can be affected by multiple Curses at the same time, with each imposing different effects that stack.

However, Curses with the same name or effect don’t stack. So an object that curses you when used for the first time cannot curse you again while you are already cursed by it.

Whenever a creature would remove a curse, that creature can choose which of the curses will be removed if possible.

There are 4 types of Curses: Normal Curses, Permanent Curses, Divine Curses, and Infernal Marks Curses.

Normal Curses can be removed by other effects. Permanent Curses cannot be removed by any means. Divine Curses can only be removed if the cursed creature completes a redemption quest. Infernal Marks can be removed if not specified otherwise and the cursed creature also carries the mark in its body, revealing it has interacted with Fiends.

Ignited

While Ignited, a creature takes a specific fire damage at the start and at the end of its turns. This fire damage is in parentheses next to the Ignited Condition.

Example: That target must succeed on an Agility Save against your Arcana, or become Ignited (1d12).

A creature must use its Action to make an Agility Save (DC 15), dousing it on a success. If the creature is Knocked Prone, it makes this Save with advantage.

A creature that takes cold damage or is underwater immediately stops being Ignited.

Ignited condition does not stack. When there are two effects that make a creature Ignited, you use the effect that deals more fire damage.

Poisoned

While Poisoned, you have disadvantage on all your Checks, Saves and Attacks.

Some poisons also deal a specified poison damage that you take during the start of your turns. The poison damage and duration of the Poisoned Condition will be in parentheses next to the Poisoned Condition.

Example: A creature must succeed on an Endurance Save against your Arcana, or become Poisoned (1d12, 2 turns).

Poisoned condition does not stack. When there are two effects that make a creature become Poisoned, you use the effect that deals more poison damage.

Keep in mind that poison damage ignores Posture.

Suffocate

While Suffocating, you need to make Endurance Saves (DC 10) at the start of your turn.

Each time you succeed this Save, the DC increases by 1. However, if you fail this Save 3 times, you die.